The RE Facilitator certificate is what’s called a micro-credential: it usually enhances an existing credential or skill.

Some enrollees economically revitalize communities. Some restore ecosystems and natural resources. Some clean and redevelop contaminated properties. Some renovate historic structures. Some renew infrastructure. Some adaptively reuse buildings. Some focus on climate restoration and/or climate change resilience.

They include architects, engineers, planners, elected leaders, government agency chiefs, NGO/non-profit leaders, lawyers, consultants, entrepreneurs, etc. All want to be more effective at making their city, region, nation and/or planet healthier and more resilient.

The impulse to improve where we live is universal.

But our definitions of “improve” vary.  For some, it means jobs, business opportunities and economic growth. Others strive for health, safety, beauty and social harmony. Many seek environmental restoration and climate resilience. 

Some of us love this work so much, we end up doing it for a living.

The scale at which we do it varies. Some people only care about their own backyard. Others feel a sense of responsibility for their neighborhood, city, state, nation and/or planet.

The way in which we do it also varies. Some do it as volunteers. Some do it as a business. Some do it as politicians.

Education and skills vary the most. A city council might comprise a rancher, a dentist, an insurance salesperson, a lawyer, an accountant, a restauranteur, an architect, a retiree, a banker, and a teacher.

No matter what their background, one factor makes all of them more effective: understanding the PROCESS of improving places.
Learning that is why people become RE Facilitators.

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